Posts Tagged ‘chat rooms’

Teaching Students about Online Safety…Online

Thursday, November 10th, 2011


Storified by Shannon Lehotsky · Wed, Oct 24 2012 07:10:12

Author:  Kevin Schuchmann, teacher at West Delaware High School, as part of A Teacher Life Guest Blog Series.

You can never underestimate the power of words. As Twittering, texting, and Facebook grows, the need for education is becoming even more important.  This past week Facebook revealed that hackers using stolen usernames and password credentials are hitting at least 600,000 accounts every day. You can read a story written by Bob Sullivan in the Redtape Chronicles on msnbc.com to confirm that stat.

Using Wiggio in my classroom makes teaching online safety, bullying, etc. a lot easier.

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) has an outstanding Website full of PowerPoint presentations, information and movies directed at educating parents, middle school, and high school students on the dangers of online communication. There are five topics.

     Online relationships
     Personal Information
     Protecting Your Reputation
     Cyber Bullying
     Safety Tips

Combing Wiggio chat rooms and file sharing with the DCJS Website puts the entire presentation into a whole new light.  The steps are simple and the results are amazing.

1. Students select a card from a deck of cards and are divided into red and black groups. Keeping chat room attendance under 12 usually keeps everyone involved.
2. Students enter into either the black or red Wiggio chat room set up previously.
3. Five moderators are selected out of each group.  Each moderator downloads the presentation’s notes from Wiggio, which include additional discussion information.
4. These moderators lead the chat room discussions with the added information while the presentation and movies from the DCJS Website play.
5. The instructor does not enter either chat room.  It is entirely the moderators’ roles to keep the discussions on track.
6. Grading is based on participation. Wiggio chat room discussions are archived. This makes it possible to check out was going on later in the day.
7. The final step is providing students with a wrap-up forum for reflection about what was gained from the presentation and discussion.

The entire process took a good hour to cover. However, the results were impressive. Here are a few of the actual comments my class posted in the follow-up forum. The sentiment was the same for every single student.

“I’m going to make sure that everything on Facebook is appropriate and there is nothing that I wouldn’t a family member or a boss seeing. I will make sure my Facebook is private and ONLY accept people that I know or I know my friends know.”
It’s sad learning about people that were victimized by predators because of something so simple that could have been changed if only they changed a couple things on Facebook/MySpace/any other social networking site.” –Rachel
“Today was very eye opening and seeing that there is a lot more things going on to people that we don’t see happening. This will make me check over everything on my Facebook page to make sure there is nothing on there that i don’t want others to see.” –Jay
“With the information presented today I am going to put my profiles as private and I am not going to add ppl that I don’t know. It kinda scares me to know how much a person can find out in 20 minutes or less just by a website.” –Tiffany

Thank you DCJS and Wiggio. You made my day and maybe changed my students’ lives.

Author:  Kevin Schuchmann, teacher at West Delaware High School, as part of A Teacher Life Guest Blog Series.

You can never underestimate the power of words. As Twittering, texting, and Facebook grows, the need for education is becoming even more important.  This past week Facebook revealed that hackers using stolen usernames and password credentials are hitting at least 600,000 accounts every day. You can read a story written by Bob Sullivan in the Redtape Chronicles on msnbc.com to confirm that stat.

Using Wiggio in my classroom makes teaching online safety, bullying, etc. a lot easier.

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) has an outstanding Website full of PowerPoint presentations, information and movies directed at educating parents, middle school, and high school students on the dangers of online communication. There are five topics.

  • Online relationships
  • Personal Information
  • Protecting Your Reputation
  • Cyber Bullying
  • Safety Tips

Combing Wiggio chat rooms and file sharing with the DCJS Website puts the entire presentation into a whole new light.  The steps are simple and the results are amazing.

  1. Students select a card from a deck of cards and are divided into red and black groups. Keeping chat room attendance under 12 usually keeps everyone involved.
  2. Students enter into either the black or red Wiggio chat room set up previously.
  3. Five moderators are selected out of each group.  Each moderator downloads the presentation’s notes from Wiggio, which include additional discussion information.
  4. These moderators lead the chat room discussions with the added information while the presentation and movies from the DCJS Website play.
  5. The instructor does not enter either chat room.  It is entirely the moderators’ roles to keep the discussions on track.
  6. Grading is based on participation. Wiggio chat room discussions are archived. This makes it possible to check out was going on later in the day.
  7. The final step is providing students with a wrap-up forum for reflection about what was gained from the presentation and discussion.

The entire process took a good hour to cover. However, the results were impressive. Here are a few of the actual comments my class posted in the follow-up forum. The sentiment was the same for every single student.

  • “I’m going to make sure that everything on Facebook is appropriate and there is nothing that I wouldn’t a family member or a boss seeing. I will make sure my Facebook is private and ONLY accept people that I know or I know my friends know.
  • It’s sad learning about people that were victimized by predators because of something so simple that could have been changed if only they changed a couple things on Facebook/MySpace/any other social networking site.” –Rachel
  • “Today was very eye opening and seeing that there is a lot more things going on to people that we don’t see happening. This will make me check over everything on my Facebook page to make sure there is nothing on there that i don’t want others to see.” –Jay
  • “With the information presented today I am going to put my profiles as private and I am not going to add ppl that I don’t know. It kinda scares me to know how much a person can find out in 20 minutes or less just by a website.” –Tiffany

Thank you DCJS and Wiggio. You made my day and maybe changed my students’ lives.